May 2012

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We set up a few non-fragile items outside of our studios in anticipation of a Calgary man who holds three world records. All requiring the use a frisbee. His latest achievement involves setting a Guinness World Record for knocking over 28 cans in one minute.

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29-year-old Rob McLeod, AKA Frisbee Rob spoke with Jennifer Keene. Rob also gave Angela Knight a demonstration of his frisbee skills, including an incident with a bird feeder, which you can listen to here:

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After nearly four months, Calgarian Rob McLeod has received confirmation that he’s tossed his way into the Guinness World Records.

At the end of January, McLeod knocked over 28 cans in 60 seconds in Calgary using Innova Zephyrs, which are used in disc golf.

Last week McLeod got the official nod from Guinness after the organization reviewed his  record-setting attempt.

“Ever since I was a kid, I used to order the Guinness Record books from my school’s book order and dream about what record read more

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Robert McLeod, from Calgary, Alberta, Canada, sets the Guinness World Record for “Most drink cans hit with a flying disc in one minute”. This is a new record so he had to hit at least 20 to set the record.

This is his first Guinness World Record and he’s already planning which one he will set next!

The final number of cans hit, which is the new record, was 28!

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Rob McLeod, a resident of Calgary, Alberta, Canada, set a new Quadruped World Record at the Houston Quadruped, March 18, 2012 in Houston, Texas when he threw a Frisbee 101.3 yards to Davy Whippet, officially setting their second World Record as a team.

“As much as it’s me throwing the disc, Davy is the reason for our success. If he wasn’t fast enough to get to my throws and smart enough to catch them, I would not be where I am today,” said McLeod.

This being only their second read more

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By the time he’d finished high school, Rob McLeod had become adept at a wide variety of sports.

“Hockey, soccer, rugby, baseball, track and field,” says the 29-year-old Calgarian, “you name it, I played it.”

When he arrived at the University of Alberta to study engineering a decade ago, then, McLeod was stunned to discover there was one sport he’d never heard of.

“I saw a bunch of guys throwing around a disc,” he says, careful to note that Frisbee, the moniker those pie-shaped contraptions read more